Aug 17

A Good Read

Some reading tips from our Facebook page, which we gladly republish on our web pages.
1. The most recent volume of Religion, State and Society 41 (2013) 2 (June) is devoted to the Church social teachings: “Aspects of Christian Social Thought”. Introduction and table of contents you will find at www.tandfonline.com.
2. The July-August 2013 number of Religion & Gesellschaft in Ost und West is dedicated to the Black Sea region, dealing with for example the protests in Turkey, the dachas of New Russians near Sochi and much about the Crimean peninsula. Unfortunately, however, the popular revolt in Bulgaria is missing. (See illustration from the Dutch evening paper NRC Handelsblad.) A table of contents you will find at www.kirchen.ch.
3. Several interesting articles about the new Russian law criminalising “offence to religious feelings” were published on 14 and 15 August 2013 at Forum 18. Supporters of the law call it a means of the state to maintain peace in society, while opponents denounce it as a tool of state oppression, which may backfire for the Orthodox Church.
4. The interesting website Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso. OBC is devoted to social and political change in South-East Europe, Turkey and the Caucasus.

Jan 10

‘Religionless culture’ in Poland

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Benno Jacob, Katharina Staritz and Edith Stein, what is the legacy of these four theologians for us? This was a central question during a discussion at the Edith Stein House in Wroclaw. About twenty participants discussed on 13 December 2012 about how the Lutheran Bonhoeffer, the Jew Jacob, the evangelical Staritz and Catholic Stein looked at culture. How did these thinkers, who were all born in Wroclaw (Breslau), view the relationship between culture, society, civilization and religion? Continue reading

Nov 23

Church Goers More Altruistic

Every two years The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP takes the temperature of Dutch society. How do the Dutch think about themselves? Are they happy? How do they see the future? How do they spend their free time? Are they religious? What is the quality of life? The outcomes sometimes seem contradictory. On average Dutch men and women feel quite happy. They have money to spend, and will see old age, but in the same time a mere 25 percent of the population is optimistic about the future; 60 percent has serious worries. While people who go to church more often are more socially active, Church membership is down. Continue reading